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Efficacy and Toxicity of Belotecan With and Without Cisplatin in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer. September 17, 2009

Posted by patoconnor in cancer, gynecological cancer, ovarian cancer, tubal cancer, uterine cancer, vaginal cancer.
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Efficacy and Toxicity of Belotecan With and Without Cisplatin in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

Am J Clin Oncol. 2009 Sep 10

Nam EJ, Kim JW, Kim JH, Kim S, Kim SW, Jang SY, Lee DW, Jung YW, Kim YT.
From the *Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women’s Cancer Clinic, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; and daggerDepartment of Gynecologic Oncology, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the safety and efficacy of belotecan, a new camptothecin analogue and potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, with and without platinum in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.
METHODS: Fifty-three patients with recurrent or persistent ovarian cancer were enrolled between March 2005 and March 2008. Eligible patients received 0.5 mg/m of intravenous (IV) belotecan on days 1 to 5, every 3 weeks belotecan monotherapy (B) or 50 mg/m of IV cisplatin on day 1 plus 0.3 mg/m of IV belotecan on days 1 to 5, every 3 weeks (belotecan plus cisplatin combination therapy [BP]).

RESULTS: Of the 53 treated patients, 34 received BP and 19 received B. Thirty-four patients had platinum-sensitive (PS) disease and 19 had platinum-resistant disease. The overall response of the 53 patients was 37.7% (20/53). According to regimen, the response rate in the BP group was 47.1% (16/34) and that of the B group was 21.1% (4/19). BP had better response (66.7%, 14/21) than B (15.4%, 2/13) for PS disease (P = 0.004), but it was not superior in terms of progression-free survival (BP, 6 month; B, 7 months). Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was less common in B than in BP.

CONCLUSION: Both BP and B seems to be effective and safe regimens for patients with PS or platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer. These results warrant further prospective randomized trials. Both BP and B seems to be effective and safe regimens for patients with PS or platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer.

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

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Treatment of recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. September 17, 2009

Posted by patoconnor in cancer, gynecological cancer, ovarian cancer, tubal cancer, uterine cancer, vaginal cancer.
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Treatment of recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2009 Aug

Pisano C, Bruni GS, Facchini G, Marchetti C, Pignata S.
Oncologia Medica, Dipartimento Uro-Ginecologico, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Napoli, Italy.

Epidemiologic analysis reveals that the mortality rate from ovarian cancer is continuously decreasing due to the improvement of surgery and chemotherapy. However, the prognosis of ovarian cancer patients is still unsatisfactory overall considering that only 30% of patients are alive after five years. In fact, although surgery and first-line systemic chemotherapy induces complete and partial response in up to 80% of patients with about a 25% pathological complete remission rate, recurrences occur in the majority of patients. The role of surgery in recurrent disease has been recently studied and many patients can receive an optimal secondary cytoreduction. Most of the recurrent patients are subject to a number of treatment regimens that, although palliative in nature, are also able to prolong survival. Important results have been obtained in particular in platinum-sensitive recurrent disease where a platinum-based chemotherapy is able to prolong progression-free survival and overall survival. Overall, our armamentarium for the treatment of progressive or recurrent ovarian cancer is significantly richer than in the past, and in many patients it is possible to achieve our goal of controlling the chronic behavior of the disease.

PubMed

Expanding the public health research agenda for ovarian cancer. September 17, 2009

Posted by patoconnor in cancer, gynecological cancer, ovarian cancer, tubal cancer, uterine cancer, vaginal cancer.
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Expanding the public health research agenda for ovarian cancer.

J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2009 Sep

Trivers KF, Stewart SL, Peipins L, Rim SH, White MC.

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. ktrivers@cdc.gov

Since the year 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has undertaken an active public health research agenda in ovarian cancer, focused mainly on research related to earlier recognition of symptoms, methods for earlier diagnosis, and optimization of treatment and end-of-life care. Much of this work was guided by external input from two workshops in 2000 and 2002 with ovarian cancer experts in clinical and epidemiological research, public health leaders from federal and state agencies, and ovarian cancer survivors. In November 2008, the CDC convened a third informal workshop of experts to comment on CDC’s work to date and to help expand the public health research agenda for the future. The purpose of the workshop was to identify and discuss urgent and emerging issues related to ovarian cancer and how public health organizations, and specifically CDC, might address these issues through research. This article provides a summary of some of the issues discussed and potential areas for future research, including genetic, screening, and diagnostic tests for ovarian cancer; ways of improving the quality of care for patients; symptom recognition; public awareness; and other emerging issues related to ovarian cancer.

PubMed