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Cancer misdiagnosis claim refuted March 2, 2012

Posted by patoconnor in cancer, gynecological cancer, ovarian cancer, tubal cancer, Uncategorized, uterine cancer, vaginal cancer.
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HOSPITAL bosses have disputed claims that three ‘serious’ cases were misdiagnosed by gynaecological departments in Oxford.

The claim was made by an anonymous GP in a survey by a doctors’ magazine.

He told GP journal Pulse he knew of three ‘serious’ cases which had been misdiagnosed by the gynaecological department at the John Radcliffe Hospital – including one of a patient with ovarian cancer.

He said: “We wrote a letter. All we wanted was something back saying ‘let’s look at this’. Instead we got a five-sentence reply saying ‘under Nice guidelines we did nothing negligent’.”

Sir Jonathan Michael, chief executive of the Oxford UniversityHospitals Trust, said: “The trust has robust processes in place to ensure that high standards of clinical care are delivered in our hospitals. If at any time a GP or patient feels that the standard of care received from our trust falls short of their expectations, we urge them to raise these through the appropriate channels.

“It is impossible to comment on such anecdotal comments given anonymously but the trust would be more than happy to address the concerns.”

Oxford Times

Let’s hear it for medical care in Oxford

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Epigenetics in ovarian cancer. February 24, 2012

Posted by patoconnor in cancer, gynecological cancer, ovarian cancer, tubal cancer, Uncategorized, uterine cancer.
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Epigenetics in ovarian cancer.

2012

Seeber LMvan Diest PJ.

Source

Department of Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecology, Gynaecological Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer. Due to few early symptoms and a lack of early detection strategies, most patients are diagnosed with advanced-stage disease. Most of these patients, although initially responsive, eventually develop drug resistance. In this chapter, epigenetic changes in ovarian cancer are described. Various epigenetic changes including CpG island methylation and histone modification have been identified in ovarian cancer. These aberrations are associated with distinct disease subtypes and present in circulating serum of ovarian cancer patients. Several epigenetic changes have shown promise for their diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive capacity but still need further validation.In contrast to DNA mutations and deletions, epigenetic modifications are potentially reversible by epigenetic therapies. Promising preclinical studies show epigenetic drugs to enhance gene re-expression and drug sensitivity in ovarian cancercell lines and animal models.